Shadara Douglas, a 17-year-old student at Oneida High School, collapsed at an Oneida business on Wednesday, June 5, 2013.
Shadara Douglas, a 17-year-old student at Oneida High School, collapsed at an Oneida business on Wednesday, June 5, 2013.

Update (June 12, 2013, 2:20 p.m.) -

KNOXVILLE — Shadara Douglas, the 17-year-old daughter of Scott County Sheriff's Department K-9 Officer Roger Douglas, died this morning at East Tennessee Children's Hospital here, family members say.

Douglas, a student at Oneida High School, had been hospitalized since June 5, when she collapsed suddenly at an Oneida business after a day spent four-wheeling in the mountains of eastern Scott County. Doctors believe she suffered from an undiagnosed heart condition that triggered her collapse.

While her condition seemed to be improving, family members said she took a turn for the worse on Tuesday.

Amid an outpouring of support for the Douglas family from the community, the Scott County Sheriff's Department has established a bank account at Citizens First Bank in Oneida for contributions to pay for Shadara's hospital bills and other costs associated with the tragedy. The Douglas family did not have health insurance.

Donations can be mailed to Citizens First Bank, P.O. Box 4639, Oneida, TN 37841.

"Roger would never ask for this himself, but you take care of your family. And that's what Roger is to the Sheriff's Department: He's family," Douglas's nephew and fellow drug agent Kris Lewallen told the Independent Herald Sunday.

The original story follows . . .

HUNTSVILLE — “Roger wouldn’t ask anyone for anything. He’s simply asking for everyone’s prayers.”

So says Scott County Sheriff’s Department Drug Agent Kris Lewallen about his coworker and uncle, Roger Douglas, whose daughter remains seriously ill after collapsing without a pulse at an Oneida business June 5.

But the Sheriff’s Department is going to bat for Douglas, a K-9 officer at the department, as the family maintains a vigil at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, hoping for the best possible outcome.

Seventeen-year-old Shadara Douglas, a student at Oneida High, collapsed at the Big Orange Country Store in Oneida Wednesday evening after a day of riding ATVs. Emergency responders had to perform CPR upon arriving on the scene, and it was described as a touch-and-go situation as she was rushed by ground ambulance to Tennova North and then to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, where she remained in a coma Tuesday.

Doctors are not completely sure what caused Shadara to collapse; Lewallen said Sunday that it is believed she suffered from a previously undetected heart condition.

The family received a bit of good news over the weekend, when doctors said Shadara is making small improvements.

“She’s moving her limbs some, moving her eyes behind her eyelids, that sort of thing,” Lewallen said. “They don’t believe the brain damage is as bad as they first feared. The doctors say they believe she will wake up; it just has to run its course.”

Once she does emerge from the coma, doctors can begin to assess Shadara’s situation more fully, Lewallen said. In the meantime, costs are quickly mounting for the Douglas family.

“Roger doesn’t have health insurance,” Lewallen said. “Doctors are doing everything they can to save her, and that’s all going to come directly out of Roger’s pocket.”

While stressing that his coworker and uncle would not ask for assistance, Lewallen said that the Sheriff’s Department has established an account at Citizens First Bank, where donations to help with medical expenses can be made. Contributions can be mailed to Citizens First Bank, P.O. Box 4639, Oneida, TN 37841.

“Roger would never ask for this himself, but you take care of family. And that’s what Roger is to the Sheriff’s Department: He’s family,” Lewallen said.

As news of his daughter’s illness reached the community, hundreds rallied around Douglas, offering words of support. A Facebook page, the Shadara Douglas Prayer Page, had nearly 1,500 likes by Monday morning.

“If there’s one thing Roger desires from the community, it’s prayers,” Lewallen said. “The only person that can heal Shadara is God, and he knows that.”

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Ben Garrett is Independent Herald editor. Contact him at bgarrett@ihoneida.com. Follow him on Twitter, @benwgarrett.